Tai Chi for Health

TAI CHI is the art of moving meditation or STILLNESS WITHIN ACTION. On how to achieve this, the ancients taught:

I CHING, HEXAGRAM 52: KEEPING STILL, MOUNTAIN

Mountain Upon Mountain:

KEEPING STILL. Keeping his back still so that he no longer feels his body.

Thus the superior man does not permit his thoughts to go beyond his situation. True quiet means keeping still when the time has come to keep still, and going forward when the time has come to go forward. In this way rest and movement are in agreement with the demands of the times, and thus there is light in life.

 

I CHING, HEXAGRAM 50, THE CALDRON

Fire Over Wood:

The image of the CALDRON. Thus the superior man consolidates his fate by making his position correct.

The fate of fire deponds on wood; as long as there is wood below, the fire burns above. it is the same in human life; there is in man likewise a fate that lends power to his life. And if he succeeds in assigning the right place to life and to fate, thus bringing the two into harmony, he puts his fate on a firm footing. These words contain hints about the fostering of life as handed on by or oral tradition in the secret teachings of Chinese yoga. (Wilhelm/Baynes edition)

 

I CHING, HEXAGRAM 17, FOLLOWING

Joy in Movement - Thunder in the Lake

The firm comes and places itself under the yielding. Movement and joyousness: Great success and perserverance without blame; thus one is followed by the whole world. Great indeed is the time of FOLLOWING.

 

 

"Ren" means to perservere, forbear, and tolerate--with a special connotation of self-restraint, self-control and sacrifice. The Chinese character is composed of "heart" with a "knife" over (or through) it, REN is a cardinal virtue in the Chinese martial arts.

 

Set the highest standards for your practice! Here is a great adage outside of the Tai Chi Classics and the best functional definition of "Kung-Fu" in English-- by one of the first and most renowned western teachers of eastern wisdom:

Consciousness is a symptom of dis-ease. All that move well moves without will. All skillfulness, all strain, all intention is contrary to ease. Practice a thousand times, and it becomes difficult; A thousand thousand, and it becomes easy; a thousand thousand times a thousand thousand, and it is no longer Thou that doeth it, but It that doeth itself through thee.  Not until then is that which is done well done.

Aleister Crowley, 1913, Founder, Ordo Templi Orientis

 

 

 

T'AI CHI CH'UAN is the classic Chinese method of calisthenics for health, self-defense and spiritual growth. Graceful in movement, slow in tempo, relaxed in continuous natural postures, Tai Chi is "meditation in movement" practiced throughout the world for its profound health benefits. The Chinese say that whoever practices T'ai Chi regularly will in time gain the pliability of a child, the vitality of a lumberjack, and the peace of mind of a sage.

The regular practice of Tai Chi promotes good health, develops keen balance and agility, and fosters higher energy levels and awareness. The cornerstone of Tai Chi practice is the "solo" exercise called the "form" in Tai Chi parlance: a slow, graceful and fluid pre-choreographed routine of relaxed natural postures and perfectly balanced movements. For beginners, form practice integrates body and mind and cultivates the body's internal energy (called "chi") while subtlely training the mind-body in a wide repertoire of Tai Chi's elegant yet very potent martial art techniques.

By combining a full range of perfect, natural movements with meditation concentration, Tai Chi practice strengthens the functioning of the central nervous system and thus effectively exercises the entire physiology, not just a few muscle groups and the cardiovascular system. The most immediate and obvious benefits are improved posture, circulation, respiration, metabolism, immunity, bone strength, muscular flexibility, and neuro-muscular functioning, as well as accelerated healing of disease and injury. Chinese physicians have long prescribed Tai Chi as physical therapy or "gymnastic medicine," in combination with herbs, acupuncture, and acupressure to provide a holistic treatment for disease. The often-amazing results of proper practice suggest that, in ways not fully known to Western science (because it has not yet accurately grasped the Chinese concept of chi (qi) and the holistic model of health premised on it), Tai Chi can indeed relieve many chronic ailments and impart longevity.

WELCOME

Taichimania.com is dedicated to preserving and proliferating the correct and healthful practice of the ancient Chinese arts of Tai Chi Chuan, Qigong, and other internal styles of Kung-fu to strengthen body and mind, purify the spirit, and develop deeper practical understanding of philosophies of Taoism and Chan Buddhism (Zen).

This site was founded in 1997 by Terence Dunn, an expert Tai Chi, Qigong, and Kung-fu instructor today with 33 years of experience in Yang style Tai Chi Chuan and Six Harmonies/Eight Methods (“Liu He Ba Fa”) Boxing, and 39 years of training in four complete schools Qigong, three styles of kung-fu, and two schools of ancient monastic Taoist healing methods. Within this site you will find informative articles by Terry Dunn, a catalog of Terry’s best-selling instructional DVD’s, and links to notable instructors, Tai Chi centers, and other sources of authentic Chinese martial, yogic and holistic health knowledge. Our time-tested and proven instructional tools are provided to aid the progress of practitioners at all levels--beginner, intermediate, and advanced--of all styles of Tai Chi, Qigong, and some forms of kung-fu.

 

"My deepest desire is that all heroes under Heaven can realize health and longevity beyond the perfection of martial technique." –Chang San-Feng, creator of Tai Chi Chuan, 13th century

Best known for popularizing the practice of Tai Chi Chuan in the West through his best-selling Tai Chi for Health Short Form and Tai Chi For Health Long Form DVD ’s over past 20 years, Terry Dunn’s emphasis in current works and future publications is on advancing Tai Chi practice beyond its health benefits:  the correct, orthodox practice of Tai Chi Chuan to develop the Tai Chi Gung-fu; the mastery of the complete art of Tai Chi Chuan as a martial art.  For it is only in striving to attain mastery under correct instruction that the maximum health and longevity benefits and practical philosophical wisdom of Tai Chi--as expressed in Taoism and Chan Buddhism (Zen)--can be activated in one's life. It is also the only means by which authentic Tai Chi Chuan can be passed on intact to future generations as a high art of enduring benefit to culture and individual spiritual growth

Beyond form practice for health, Tai Chi's sparring practice with a partner known as "Push-hands" (tui-shou) with its unique emphasize on yielding and "sticking to one's opponents" in order to neutralize and unbalance them imparts its own particular benefits, notably the mastery of a practical and noble method of self-defense and the transcendence of fear. Push-hands practice is also the self-defense laboratory that provides experiential understanding of the principles of Taoism, which is the sublime and practical, life-embracing, quintessentially holistic philosophy based on living and acting in accord with nature's cyclical patterns of change and emulating its intrinsic virtue and power.

Nothing under heaven is more pliable than water. But when amassed, there is nothing that can withstand it. That the soft overcomes the hard and the yielding conquers the unyielding is a fact known to all men, but practiced by none. -- Tao Te Ching --

The vitalities of Heaven and Earth, sun and moon, are fundamentally inherent in our bodies. If reality and consciousness do not stray from each other, Creation is always in the palm of your hand.--Chang Po-Tuan, Inner Teachings of Taoism--

Tai Chi Motion Study by Jay Mark Johnson, Ace Gallery

The Tao-Path is not the All-Tao. The Name is not the Thing named. Unmanifested, it is the Secret Father of Heaven and Earth; manifested, it is their Mother. To understand this Mystery, one must be fulfilling one's will. If one is not thus free, one will but gain a smattering of it.

--Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching --

 

 

 

 


intro info | videos | classes & workshops | Tai Chi Qigong info | Terry Dunn | contact us